The Cinque Ports Coronation Privileges

By Ken Clarke

Although the origins of the Cinque Ports are unknown, their individual beginnings preceded the Norman Conquest, for the Domesday Book records that during the reign of Edward the Confessor the burgesses of Dover. Continue reading The Cinque Ports Coronation Privileges

Mayor’s Report 2015

 

Rye Town Meeting – Mayor’s Overview of 2014-15

Perhaps the Council’s most popular decision over the past 12 months was the appointment of a town steward for the Parish. In response to numerous complaints over the last few years, Nicky Ledger was appointed in January to help improve the appearance of the Parish and make Rye a more attractive place in which to live, work, study and visit. Continue reading Mayor’s Report 2015

Nazi Invasion Between Hastings and Hythe

After the evacuation of Dunkirk, there was a period of intense activity to prepare defences against an immanently expected invasion of South East England. The Germans were massed on the French coast after their lightening victories in France and the Low Countries. Now Britain was firmly in their sights. It would only be a matter of time before they turned their attention to invading the land they could see just 22 miles away over the English Channel. Continue reading Nazi Invasion Between Hastings and Hythe

Editorial

Easter comes early this year and, if the weather is kind, Rye traders could get the shot in the arm they so badly need after the hard times they have endured throughout the tough winter weather and financial blizzards that have been blowing through the High Street. Continue reading Editorial

Remembering ‘The Few’

 

The Battle of Britain was fought in the skies above Rye in July, August & September of 1940. In the immortal words of Winston Churchill “Never in the field of human conflict was so much owed by so many to so few” Continue reading Remembering ‘The Few’

Rye 1946

1945 saw the end of World War Two. VE Day (victory in Europe) and
VJ Day (victory in Japan) came and went. Rye, along with towns all
over the country, licked it’s wounds, mourned its dead and rejoiced
in the return of many servicemen who had been away from their home
for as long as six years. Continue reading Rye 1946

Rye Bonfires of the Past

 

Recapture Moments from the Past, Worthy of Preservation.

Sixty years ago in 1945 the Second World War had just reached it’s terrible conclusion with the discovery of the death camps in Europe and the dropping of two atom bombs on Japan. Continue reading Rye Bonfires of the Past

Brenzett Aero Museum

Two aircraft stand motionless in the corner of a field near Brenzett round-a-bout. All who pass that way cannot have failed to have seen them. What message have these two relics of a past era got for the young people of today’s modern World? Continue reading Brenzett Aero Museum

The Long Journey Part Five

The Long Journey

The concluding episode in Michael Whiteman’s epic account of his days as a P.O.W

From the Danube to Rye

The next day, the same thing, but we had hardly started work when the sirens blared, we were taken under the sub-way at the station which we weren’t too happy about, as we thought that was what might possibly be bombed. Anyway, as soon as the all clear was shouted we came back over the river to the farm, we didn’t go back to the town again, thank goodness. At about six o’clock in the morning round about the 17th April we moved off to another ferry along the river, it brought us to the south side of the Regensburg, where we went into another farmyard. It had been kept very clean, the buildings were all the way around a central yard. We occupied one of the buildings away from the main house. It was while we were here that the air-raids started again over the town. The day after this nasty one, we were told that a party of POWs were crossing the Continue reading The Long Journey Part Five